Art History and Visual Culture Minor

HFA PEAK

 

15 credits

 

The study of art history and visual culture covers the historical physical, social, intellectual, religious, and political contexts that give rise to works of art and architecture, and may include imagery to be found in movies, plays, advertisements, scientific illustrations, political posters, fashion, pornography, comics, graphic novels, web pages, YouTube, graffiti, tattoos, and many other areas of visual expression. The methodologies employed to do this encompass the traditional art historical tools of formal and iconographical analysis, often supplemented by approaches drawn from social sciences such as anthropology, sociology, film theory, and psychology.

 

Minor Requirements

Complete the following (3 credits):

ART-111Ways of Seeing

3 credits

Complete one course from the following (3 credits):

ARH-200Ancient to Medieval

3 credits

ARH-205Renaissance to Modern

3 credits

Complete two courses from the following (6 credits):

ARH-300Modern Art

3 credits

ARH-330Picasso and 20th Century Art

3 credits

ARH-340Gender in Modern and Contemporary Art

3 credits

ARH-370Art History Seminar

3

Complete one course from the following (3 credits):

ENG225Asia Through Its Movies

3 credits

HIS-202History & the Movies

3 credits

HIS-356The Body in History

3 credits

IND-307.1London: Art/History/Literature

3 credits

PSY-254Psychology & the Movies

3 credits

PSY-336Psychology of Human Vision: Theory and Application

3 credits

PSY-410Media Psychology

3 credits

SOC-100Introduction to Sociology

3 credits

THE-200Introduction to Film Studies

3 credits

Outcomes

Upon successfully completing this minor, students will be able to:


1) Use the tools of formal analysis and simple sketching skills to communicate how images may be designed to create compelling visual effects;
2) Use the tools of iconographic analysis to communicate how images may be created to convey complex symbolic meanings;
3) Use tools of theoretical and contextual analysis to communicate how historical and societal factors affect the design, symbolism, and reception of images; and
4) Demonstrate engagement with the visual production of non-dominant cultures and sub-cultures.